Should you rework your elevator speech?

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Is your approach resonating with prospects, what are their first impressions?

 

 

Creating a customer-enticing elevator speech

An elevator speech is a short description (as long as it would take to go a few levels in an elevator) of your practice that enables prospective buyers to know what value you bring to the relationship. An elevator speech conveys a marketing message in a manner that literally attracts the right clients to you.

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“So what do you do”? A million-dollar question!  Every day you meet people who could use your services. But unless you tell them what you do in a quick and compelling manner, those relationships go nowhere.

If you answer it correctly, the barriers protecting the inner sanctums of clients and prospects come tumbling down and the red carpet is rolled out for you. Answer it incorrectly and you get stuck on the outside, envious of those who managed to get in and wondering why no one wants to meet with you

Today’s the average person is bombarded with thousands of marketing messages from multiple mediums every day, television, radio, road signs, email, banner ads, direct mail, clothing, pens, newspapers and magazines. These pervasive, and often intrusive methods of capturing attention have created a backlash; most people don’t even notice them anymore.

To break through all this marketing clutter, it’s imperative to have an enticing elevator speech that speaks directly to the needs of your person you want as a client,  and, it has to roll off your tongue easily, naturally and conversationally.

Customers don’t care what you do and they don’t much care how you do it. But they do care deeply about their own problems and frustrations. They’ll be extremely interested in what you are offering if you can do things such as:

  • Solving a pressing problem or frustration.
  • Meeting their immediate wants and needs.
  • Improving their cash flow and profits.
  • Increasing their sales.
  • Cut their costs.
  • Eliminating barriers and bottlenecks.
  • Improving operational efficiency.
  • Enhance their customer experience and loyalty.
  • Open up new markets for them.
  • Create new ideas and opportunities to help their business.

This is the most important thing to remember as you develop your own elevator speech. Focus on what the outcomes will be for the customer, not on what you do.

 

Use the following worksheet to capture and develop your thoughts

 

  1. Specify the type of customer you want to attract.

 

 

  1. What are the problems and frustrations that your product or service will solve?

 

 

  1. Describe how your ideal customer ‘feels’ about these problems and frustrations.

 

 

  1. State the outcomes your customers receive from using your product or service.

 

 

  1. Refine your lists.
  • Most relevant problems and frustrations you solve.
  • Words that best describe how your ideal customer feels about the problems.
  • Most appropriate and compelling benefits you provide.
  1. Write a problem-centred elevator speech
  • Start by writing out a number of different versions. See which elevator speech receives the best reactions from your colleagues, friends and customers you respect.

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[read more=”Personal Experience” less=”Personal Experience”]

Personal Experience

Most people meet thousands of people in their business career, but few realise the impression that is made in the first two minutes. People judge you and make assumptions about whether to do business or not in those critical minutes.

These are the obvious things, but the less obvious is letting good opportunities slip through your fingers because people take in the wrong information about you. So, for this reason, I recommend you polish up your elevator speech.

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