Can you identify your psychological risk factors?

Worrying won’t stop problems and frustrations, it just wastes valuable planning time.

 

Why is it important?

A workplace where everybody is supportive of each other’s psychological and mental health concerns and respond appropriately as needed is ideal. For some organisations, the most important aspect of psychological support may be to protect each other against traumatic stressors at work.

Employees that feel they have psychological support have greater job attachment, job commitment, job satisfaction, job involvement, positive work moods, desire to remain with the organisation, and job performance.

People’s perceptions of a lack of psychological support can lead to:

  • Strain – which can lead to fatigue, headaches, burnout and anxiety.
  • Withdrawal behaviours.
  • Conflict.
  • Increased absenteeism.
  • Turnover of staff.
  • Loss of productivity.
  • Increased costs.
  • Greater risk of accidents, incidents and injuries.

Advisors can provide a level of psychological support to assist individuals in addressing the risk factors and boosting their performance at work. Burnout should be a thing of the past with the knowledge we have today.

The specific level of support needed depends on individual needs but can include achieving more productive sales, helping to correct financial problems, Understanding health problems, building better relationships, building specific skills, or helping to shape the future direction of the business.

The specific level of support depends on individual needs but can include achieving more productive sales, helping to correct financial problems, building better relationships, building specific skills, or helping to shape the future direction of the business.

The more research you do and the more experience you have, the more you will realise that many people advising SMEs are corporate and government people, who really have very little understanding of how a smaller business and its people really think and work. Most of them have never owned a business of their own.  In most of the life’s endeavours, people don’t fully understand unless they have “been there and done that”.

 

“To get Game-Changing results, start focusing on Game-Changing thoughts”. Robin Sharma

 

The following are some psychological risk factors associated with business:

 

  • Lack of sales and profit.
  •  UUndercapitalizationand cash flow.
  •  Poor health.
  • Lack of support.
  • Poor technology and systems.
  • Working alone and in isolation.
  •  Employee problems and conflicts.
  • Customer pressures.
  • Disruptions.
  •  Insufficient staff.
  • Lack of planning.
  • Trying to implement poor strategies.
  • Work overload.
  • Workflow and types of work.
  •  The working environment.
  • Exclusiveness.
  • Leadership issues.
 

  • Family pressures, life/work pressures.
  • Bullying and conflict.
  • Micro-management.
  • High physical, or emotional demands.
  • Tight timeframes.
  • Social media.
  • Excessive demands for high output.
  • Shiftwork and extended hours of work.
  •  Skills inappropriately utilised.
  • Inadequate skills.
  • Non-participation.
  • Inappropriate performance targets.
  • Resources availability, or lack of.
  • Decision making and discretion.
  • Excessive competition.
  • Information overload.
  • Succession planning.

Why do only a small number of businesses survive? This is the question that needs to be understood. There is obviously much more to it than most people realise. SMEs get on the treadmill, heading for failure and then find it difficult to get off. They seek advice from professionals, banks and other corporate people, who typically advise them:

  • “You need more sales”.
  • “You need more capital”.
  • “You need to improve your cash flow”.
  • “You need to reduce your costs”.

Sounds good, but they can rarely tell them how to do it, particularly in a language that they can understand and especially when the owner is under extreme personal or business pressure.

Without the ‘how to…’ they only add to the pressure and stress. They produce nice looking (and expensive) reports that nobody has time to wade through, let alone act upon and when you ask them to show them what to do, they tend to back away.

 

[read more=”Personal Experience” less=”Personal Experience”]

Personal Experience:

The capacity of an advisor or any type, to provide substantial psychological, as well as material support should not be underestimated, at any stage of a business’s or non-profit’s development.

The culture in am organisation sets the tone for a harmonious and flexible working environment.  A culture of negativity can undermine the best of intentions and the effectiveness of any wellness programs.

An unhealthy culture creates more stress, which put the employees and the whole business on a downward spiral that can be hard to reverse.  A culture of profit at all costs and constant chaotic urgency can create a working environment in which burnout is the norm.

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